Nell Larson

Producer/ Co-Host

Co-host of KPCW's This Green Earth.

Nell Larson has been the director of Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter since 2013, but has been a co-host of This Green Earth since 2009.  Prior to her role as director at Swaner, Nell acted as Conservation Director, where she focused on the restoration and management of the 1,200 acre nature preserve, implementing projects geared toward stream restoration, water quality, wildlife habitat, and trails.  Nell grew up in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York.  She completed her undergraduate degree at Yale, as well as her master of Environmental Management with a focus in ecology at the Yale School of Forestry.  Outside of work, Nell loves to ski - both Nordic and alpine - sail, hike, travel, kickball, and generally take advantage of Utah's great outdoors.

Ways to Connect

This Green Earth - January 9, 2018

Jan 9, 2018

As this year began, China banned the importing of 24 different materials considered recyclables. What are these materials? How will this ban effect U.S. recycling markets? And who might replace China as the leader in reprocessing our paper, plastic and metal?  Nell and Chris speak with Reece Demille of Republic Services and Carolyn Wawra of Recycle Utah about how the ban will affect their recycling businesses, and what you can do to help.

This Green Earth January 2, 2018

Jan 2, 2018

On today's show, Chris and Nell speak first with Brian McInerney of the National Weather Service.  Brian will summarize this fall's temperatures and precipitation and review 2017 as a whole, one of the warmest years on record.  In the second part of the show, Nate Brown of the Audubon Society talks about the results of this year's Christmas Bird Count, including Summit County observations and how bird types and populations are changing as our region warms and habitats shrink. 

 

Tuesday on This Green Earth, Nell and Chris first speak with authors of a study which shows that, for the first time in almost 80 years, Black Bears are re-populating portions of eastern Nevada's Great Basin.   Then, in the second half of the show, arborologist   Jason Barto talks about the impacts the lack of snow is having on your trees, and how watering them - yes, this week - might be a good idea.  It's This Green Earth, Tuesday at 9am. 

 

Ashley Solteysiak is the new director of the Sierra Club’s Utah Chapter.  Chris and Nell visit with her to learn a bit about her background and get the outlook for the 2018 state legislative session, focusing on legislation that impacts our air, land and water. Then, in the second half of the program, they talk about the inversion occurring along the front range of the Wasatch with Randy Graham, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

The President visited Salt Lake City Monday to announce his plans to reduce the proposed Bears Ears National Monument by 50-percent.  Sharon Buccino is an attorney and land policy expert with the National Resources Defense Council.  Chris and Nell talk about this decision with her, what legal actions can and will be pursued to challenge it, and what this decision means to the fate of other national monuments across the country.  Then in the second half of the program, they shift gears and talk about our growing trash problem in Park City.

On today’s program, Chris and Nell visit with Jess Dwyer with the Salt Lake Chapter of Dark Sky International.  They speak about light pollution, its impact on our health and environment and what some communities are doing about it. 

  Today on This Green Earth, Nell and Chris speak with James Costa, the author of the new book:  Darwin's Backyard:  How Small Experiments Led to a Big Theory. Costa explains how Darwin's simple experiments on plants, insects and animals living in his own backyard, helped advance many of his revolutionary ideas on evolution and natural selection.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris and Nell’s first guest is Marlee Ostheimer from the National Forest Foundation.  Marlee talks about the effort to reintroduce the Bonneville Cutthroat Trout to Mill Creek.  The second guest is Urs Kormann, a post-doctoral research scientist at Oregon State University.  Urs talks about “forest edges” and what species avoid and benefit them.  

  Chris and Nell speak with Jon Schutz, a local water rights attorney.  Jon will summarize the history of water rights in Utah, how they were established using ecclesiastical control, when that changed and why, even with growing demand and regional drought, concepts like "use it or lose it" are still used today.   Then, former Congressman Bob Inglis talks about a speech he is giving this Friday, November 3rd at the Hinckley Institute of Politics.  Bob is a republican from South Carolina who received high marks from his colleagues and constituents until he embraced one subject - climate chan

On This Green Earth this morning Chris and Nell speak with students from BYU and the University of Utah on how they are collaborating with, and competing against, each other on climate change education, awareness and initiatives.  Then they speak with the Western Environmental Law Center about the Department of Interior's recent attempts to delay the implementation of a rule which would reduce the amount of methane gas emitted into the atmosphere from natural gas wells and distribution systems.     

Pages