Juana Summers

Juana Summers is a reporter covering education for NPR.

Prior to coming to NPR, Summers spent nearly four years as a reporter for POLITICO, where she focused on political and campaign coverage, primarily the 2012 Republican primary and general election. She has also extensively covered defense policy and veterans affairs, and authored POLITICO's morning defense newsletter.

Before that, she covered statewide and local politics for the Kansas City Star and St. Louis Post-Dispatch, as well as KBIA-FM. Her work has also been featured in the Austin American-Statesman and The Washington Post.

Summers is a regular guest host for C-SPAN's "Washington Journal" and a frequent guest on CNN's "Inside Politics", MSNBC's "Weekends With Alex Witt" and other cable news programs. She was a commentator for BET during the 2012 Democratic and Republican National Conventions.

Summers served one term on the board of directors of the Online News Association, the largest non-profit organization of digital journalists. She is an alumna of the Chips Quinn Scholars program, the New York Times Journalism Institute and the Society of Professional Journalists Reporters Institute.

A native of Kansas City, Missouri, Summers is a graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism.

It's All Politics
4:11 am
Sun October 12, 2014

In Northern Virginia, Candidates See Opportunity In Asian Vote

In a campaign ad from John Foust, the candidate tries to appeal to Korean voters.
YouTube

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 11:14 am

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Fri August 8, 2014

Education Reform Is Becoming A Celebrity Cause

Whoopi Goldberg spoke out against teacher tenure during an episode of The View.
John Shearer AP

Celebrities are becoming a prominent fixture in the debate over K-12 education.

This week Whoopi Goldberg used her platform on ABC's The View to speak out against teacher tenure.

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NPR Ed
1:24 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: For 30 Years, Baltimore Study Tracked Who Gets Ahead

A rooftop view of East Baltimore, 1979.
Elinor Cahn Courtesy of Elinor Cahn Photographs, The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Originally published on Sun August 10, 2014 4:21 pm

Education is historically considered to be the thing that levels the playing field, capable of lifting up the less advantaged and improving their chances for success.

"Play by the rules, work hard, apply yourself and do well in school, and that will open doors for you," is how Karl Alexander, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist, puts it.

But a study published in June suggests that the things that really make the difference — between prison and college, success and failure, sometimes even life and death — are money and family.

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NPR Ed
5:29 am
Sat June 14, 2014

The Anatomy Of A Dress Code

Joanna Neborsky for NPR

For principals and administrators, spring means a welcome end to snow days and delayed start times. But as the flowers and trees emerge from their winter slumber, so too do short pants, T-shirts, flip-flops and the inevitable battles over what kids can and can't wear to school.

It might as well be called "dress code" season.

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