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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Rob Store, Go To Prison, Serve Time, Repeat?

Christopher Miller, who police say returned to the scene of his crime.
N.J. Department of Corrections

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 7:43 am

A man who spent more than 13 years in jail for robbing a New Jersey shoe store returned to the scene of the crime one day after his release from prison and robbed the business again, police say.

Christopher Miller, 40, was released from South Woods State Prison in Bridgeton, N.J., on Friday.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Wed March 26, 2014

'Bishop Of Bling' Gets The Boot

Then-Bishop Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst last August. The Vatican has accepted his resignation. Tebartz-van Elst spent lavishly on renovations at his residence and allegedly made false statements about expensive travel costs.
Fredrik Von Erichsen DPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 10:10 am

The more than $40 million he allowed to be spent on renovations at his residence and allegations that he lied about some of his other lavish spending have now officially cost the "bishop of bling" his job.

The Vatican announced Wednesday that it has accepted the resignation of Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst, who had been the bishop of Limburg, Germany. He will be assigned other duties.

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The Two-Way
5:44 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Washington Mudslide: Fewer Missing As Death Toll Stays Put, For Now

There was a candlelight vigil Tuesday near the site of the mudslide that tore through the tiny community of Oso, Wash.
Rick Wilking Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 3:30 am

This post is being updated. Click here to jump to our latest additions.

Weary searchers resumed their dangerous work Wednesday near Oso, Wash., where it's thought at least 25 people — and possibly many more — died when a massive mudslide buried dozens of homes and businesses on Saturday.

Headlines and news outlets' updates helped tell the story as the day began:

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The Two-Way
4:59 am
Wed March 26, 2014

More Images, More Possible Debris, But No Sure Sign Of Flight 370

Crew members on the Chinese icebreaker Xue Long scanned the southern Indian Ocean on Wednesday as they assisted in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Earlier this year, the Xue Long assisted in the rescue of more than 50 scientists and paying passengers from a ship that got stuck in the Antarctic Ocean.
Zhang Jiansong Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:10 am

This post has been updated with word that the aerial search is over for today.

Images taken on Sunday by a French satellite show 122 "potential objects" in the area of the southern Indian Ocean that searchers are now combing for any sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Malaysia's acting transport minister said Wednesday.

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It's All Politics
4:56 am
Wed March 26, 2014

In Ohio, Gov. Kasich Rises From Forsaken to Favorite

Ohio Gov. John Kasich delivers his State of the State address Feb. 24 at the Performing Arts Center in Medina, Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 4:37 pm

Early in his term, Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich was considered the most unpopular governor in the country. Between that and a sputtering state economy, a second term looked like a dicey proposition.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Most People Don't Know The Health Insurance Deadline Looms

Yudelmy Cataneda, Javier Suarez and Claudia Suarez talk with insurance agent Yosmay Valdivian at a session to sign up for health insurance in a Miami mall March 20.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:51 am

Next week is the last chance for most people without insurance to sign up for individual health coverage for the remainder of 2014.

Yet according to the latest monthly tracking poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation, more than 60 percent of those without coverage still don't know that.

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Parallels
1:39 am
Wed March 26, 2014

From Pancho Villa To Panda Express: Life In A Border Town

Columbus, N.M., was raided by Pancho Villa in 1916 and by federal agents in 2011.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:12 am

Columbus, N.M., is all about the border. It's an official border crossing. Its history centers on a cross-border raid. In more recent years, it was a transit point for illegal weapons heading south into Mexico.

It's also the destination for children heading north to a U.S. school.

All the different strands of Columbus came together when we spent the day with the new mayor of the village. Phillip Skinner, former real estate developer and maquiladora owner-turned politician and school bus driver, was inaugurated early this month, on the morning we rolled into town.

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Politics
1:30 am
Wed March 26, 2014

How To Meet Your Congressman

The Capitol Dome is visible through the skylights of the new Capitol Visitor Center.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 1:21 pm

For all the campaigning and schmoozing members of Congress have to do, the truth is that the vast majority of Americans will never actually meet their lawmakers.

To be fair, not everyone wants to. But among those who do, there's serious competition for a lawmaker's time. So, how does an average citizen get access on Capitol Hill? The quick answer: It's not easy.

First, do the math. When it comes to face time with a member of Congress, there are 535 of them, and 314 million of you.

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The Salt
1:22 am
Wed March 26, 2014

In Mexico And U.S., Lime Lovers Feel Squeezed By High Prices

A worker unloads a truck full of Mexican limes at a citrus packing plant in La Ruana, in the state of Michoacan, Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:11 pm

Has the price of your margarita cocktail shot up? Guacamole more expensive? Blame it on limes.

About 98 percent of limes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico. But our neighbors to the south are feeling seriously squeezed by a shortage of the beloved citrus fruit.

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The Salt
1:21 am
Wed March 26, 2014

What A Long, Strange Trip: Salmon Are Trucking To The Pacific Ocean

Pacific Or Bust: Fingerling Chinook salmon are dumped into a holding pen as they are transferred from a truck into the Sacramento River Tuesday in Rio Vista, Calif. From here, they'll be towed downstream for a bit, then make their own way out to the Pacific Ocean.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

In California, severe drought has imperiled millions of juvenile salmon who now face waters too dry to let them make their usual spawning trip to the ocean. So state and federal officials have embarked on a drastic plan to save them – by letting them hitch a ride on tanker trucks.

Over the next two and a half months, some 30 million Chinook salmon will be trucked from five hatcheries in the state's Central Valley to waters where they can make their way to the ocean.

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