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Education
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

The Charter School Vs. Public School Debate Continues

The latest study says kids learn better in charter schools than in public schools. But even charter school supporters question the study and its methods of research.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

Charter schools turn 21 this year. In that time, these privately run, publicly funded schools have spread to 41 states and enrolled more than 2 million students.

But one key question lingers: Do kids in charter schools learn more than kids in traditional public schools?

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Business
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

D.C. Wage Rift Puts Spotlight On Wal-Mart's Urban Push

The scene in a Wal-Mart store in Alexandria, Va. Cities are a key growth area for retailers since suburbs are already saturated with big-box stores.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

Wal-Mart's long-standing plans to come to Washington, D.C., are now up in the air. The City Council passed a living wage law that would require the world's largest retailer to pay $12.50 an hour, more than the city's current $8.25 minimum wage.

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Science
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Eavesdropping On Nature Gives Clues To Biodiversity

Scientists could use recordings of wildlife to monitor the movements of invasive species like the European starling.
Liz Leyden iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:00 pm

Biology professor Mitch Aide uses his ears to learn about the frogs, birds and insects that are all around him. This scientist at the University of Puerto Rico is trying to track how animal populations are affected by a world that's under increasing pressure from human activities.

Aide says, "We would like to have five, 10, 20 years of data of how populations are changing."

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Cerner Fights For Share In Electronic Medical Records Boom

Pretty servers hold private health data at Cerner.
Courtesy of Cerner Corp.

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

This is a story about data. Lots and lots of data. And they're not just any data — they're extremely sensitive data.

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The Salt
3:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Can Oysters With No Sex Life Repopulate The Chesapeake Bay?

Young oysters live on old oyster shells and slowly mature while forming a complete shell.
Astrid Riecken Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

The Chesapeake Bay once supplied half the world's oyster market. But pollution, disease and over-harvesting have nearly wiped out the population. It's a dire situation that's united former adversaries to revive the oyster ecosystem and industry.

Scientists and watermen have joined forces to plant underwater farms in the bay with a special oyster bred in a lab. Called triploid oysters, they have been selected for attributes like disease tolerance and fast growth.

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Code Switch
2:00 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Of Hoodies And Lost Time

After Sam Sanders learned of the Zimmerman verdict, one of the first things he did was count his hoodies.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:16 pm

The Code Switch team came across this blog post by Sam Sanders, our colleague at NPR. We thought it spoke to the resignation so many people felt following Trayvon Martin's shooting. Sam was kind enough to let us share it here.

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It's All Politics
1:56 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

3 Reasons The Senate Didn't Go Nuclear

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain was credited by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid with playing a crucial role in the filibuster pact.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:55 pm

With Tuesday's bipartisan agreement to let senators vote on seven of President Obama's previously stalled nominations, the Senate proved that the art of compromise isn't dead in Washington, even if it might be severely wounded.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

'Dear George Zimmerman' Letter Hits Home With Many

George Zimmerman during his trial.
Joe Burbank/pool UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:46 pm

There are obviously more provocative things being written and said about the death of Trayvon Martin and the acquittal of George Zimmerman than we could ever hope to keep up with.

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Around the Nation
1:29 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Baseball League Creates 'Islands' Of Refuge For Camden Kids

Angel Ramirez, a North Camden Little League player, walks through the Sixth Street drug corridor, known as "Heroin Highway," on his way home from practice in Camden, N.J. The Little League program is aimed at keeping kids in the struggling city engaged in a sport after school.
Gabe Dinsmoor for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

At a small park in Pyne Poynt on the north side of Camden, N.J., kids take practice cuts on the infield dirt and adjust their hats. A small but enthusiastic crowd shouts words of encouragement, but the cheering parents and playful bench-side scuffles only momentarily disguise the troubles in the city. Baggies, vials and hypodermic needles litter the same field where practice is being held.

"Each day, our kids walk past drug sets and open air drug use," says Bryan Morton, the North Camden Little League president.

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Shots - Health News
12:43 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Mining Cell Data To Answer Cancer's Tough Questions

Chemistry, genetics and computing give us clues to understand cancer cells.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:47 pm

Sometimes a drug hits cancer hard. Sometimes the cancer cells are unfazed. But it's often hard to know which outcome to expect.

A group of scientists at the National Cancer Institute has spent the last three years turning some mathematical algorithms loose on giant sets of data to better understand the relationship between cancerous cells and cancer drugs.

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