All Tech Considered
8:00 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Police May Know Exactly Where You Were Last Tuesday

An Arizona Department of Public Safety officer keeps an eye on his dashboard computer as it reads passing car license plates.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 9:06 am

License plate scanners are the dark horse of the surveillance world. They've been around for a decade, but people rarely notice. They don't look much different from closed circuit cameras, perched over busy intersections. Or they're just another device mounted on a passing police car.

But they notice you: A scanner can ID thousands of plates a day. And a new ACLU report says the vast majority of police agencies now use them.

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Bernanke: Fed's Monetary Policies Not On 'A Preset Course'

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington, D.C., last month.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 10:22 am

In testimony before the House Committee on Financial Services, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said that when and how the Fed winds down its stimulus programs will depend on economic conditions.

Here's the key passage from Bernanke's prepared remarks:

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Wed July 17, 2013

4 Zimmerman Jurors: Juror B37 Does Not Speak For Us

George Zimmerman "probably feared for his life," juror B37 told CNN.
Gary W. Green EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:44 pm

Four women who served on the jury that acquitted George Zimmerman are distancing themselves from Juror B37, the anonymous woman who gave an extensive interview to CNN about the case.

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The Two-Way
5:32 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Book News: Hemingway Look-Alike Competition To Crown New 'Papa'

American writer Ernest Hemingway.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 5:13 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:28 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Lawyer: Snowden Could Leave Moscow Airport Within A Week

Terminal F of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport where Edward Snowden remains.
Paul Gypteau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 10:22 am

A day after submitting an application for temporary asylum in Russia, the lawyer representing Edward Snowden tells Russia's Interfax news agency that the NSA leaker could leave the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport within a week.

Reuters reports:

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The Two-Way
4:55 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In India, At Least 22 Children Die After Eating Poisoned School Lunch

A woman cries after her grandson, who consumed a poisoned meal at a school on Tuesday, died at a hospital in the eastern Indian city of Patna.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:42 pm

At least 22 children are dead in India after they ate a poisoned school lunch Tuesday at a school in the eastern state of Bihar.

The images are horrific. The AFP reports:

"There were emotional scenes as children, their limbs dangling and heads lolling to one side, were brought to a hospital in the Bihar city of Chhapra.

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Jenna Dooley has spent her professional career in public radio. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University and the Public Affairs Reporting Program at the University of Illinois - Springfield. She returns to Northern Public Radio in DeKalb after several years hosting Morning Edition at WUIS-FM in Springfield.  For 2012, she was named "Newsfinder of the Year" by the Illinois Associated Press. She is not afraid to brag at parties that she has met Carl Kasell, Ira Glass, and Garrison Keillor (and has pictures to prove it). She and her husband live in Aurora.

Shots - Health News
1:02 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Red blood cells are normally shaped like doughnuts, but sickle cells (purple) are flattened and clump together.
NIH

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 8:45 am

Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as, say, malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.

The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.

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Joe's Big Idea
1:01 am
Wed July 17, 2013

All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood

Wood fibers are coated with carbon nanotubes and then packed into small disks of metal. The sodium ions moving around in the wood fibers create an electric current.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 3:08 am

The big idea behind Joe's Big Idea is to report on interesting inventions and inventors. When I saw the headline "An Environmentally Friendly Battery Made From Wood," on a press release recently, I figured it fit the bill, so went to investigate.

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The Salt
1:00 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply.
Natalie Behring Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:34 pm

The strange case of genetically engineered wheat on a farm in Oregon remains as mysterious as ever. If anything, it's grown more baffling.

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