Mountain Accord

Park City Council Member Andy Beerman, also on the executive committee of the Mountain Accord says there are reasons to stick with studying the tunnel option from Cottonwood Canyons to Park City, if nothing else than to eliminate it once and for all.  He speaks with KPCW's Lynn Ware Peek.

There is more criticism being directed at the Mountain Accord process - this time from Pat Shea, Salt Lake attorney and former director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. In a recent op-ed written for the Salt Lake Tribune, Shea charges that the agenda behind the Accord, for some private and public interests, is to facilitate development on the Wasatch and transportation systems to help the tourism industry. Still, he told KPCW, his aim isn't to defeat the Accord, but set it in the right direction. Rick Brough has more.

'Transportation's Uncomfortable Choices' was the topic for Thursday night's public panel discuss and forum, hosted by the Project for a Deeper Understanding. Moderated by former Summit County Commissioner and KPCW Board President Bob Richer lead the panel into a discussion of options and plans involving transportation into and around Summit County.

Panelists included:

The Summit County Council and Park City Council, covening Thursday after a series of meetings this week, heard from their consultant about the growth explosion project to come by the middle of the century - a prospect he calls "Provo in the mountains". 
In the midst of that, consultant Charles Buki outlined some problems he sees in the Mountain Accord planning process, after his discussions with city and council officials. Rick Brough has more.

The Mountain Accord process - which aims to guide the management of and preserve the Central Wasatch has made a substantial outreach to the public, and finds the engagement is informed, passionate, and participatory. Lynn Ware Peek has more.

Park City Municipal and Summit County officials will compile data this week collected by those who attended Monday's Mountain Accord meeting, to flush out what the public added to the process of what County Manager Bob Jasper calls, "saving the Wasatch from being 'loved to death'." Rick Brough has more.

courtesy Brooks Robinson

A group of experts laid out plans for the Mountain Accord process - still in the draft phase - before a packed room of curious onlookers Monday evening. They address how this group will address the management of population pressures along the mountains, canyons and valleys of the central Wasatch. Lynn Ware Peek has more.

Utah Department of Transportation

Summit Council Member David Ure says he was happy to see a big turn out at last week's Transportation Forum - with people speaking out, he says,  who knew what they wanted.   More with Rick Brough.

The Mountain Accord process is ready to launch into the next phase of merging priorities for the Central Wasatch by overlaying the separate interests of the groups representing recreation, the economy, transportation and the environment. Lynn Ware Peek has more.

Members of the Summit County Council are concerned about what's happening in the Mountain Accord process.

Talking to his colleagues Wednesday, Council Member Roger Armstrong spurred comments. He said that with time running out, the Accord discussions on transportation aren't getting down to brass tacks. More troubling, he said, Summit County is being treated as an afterthought, and it feels like the tenor of the meetings is tilting against a possible light rail up Parley's Canyon - but in favor of a rail up SAlt Lake's Cottonwood Canyon. Rick Brough has more.

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