Local News

Hard news covering local government: Park City, Summit County and Wasatch County - city and county councils, planning boards, water entities and issues specific the Wasatch Back.

On today's show, host Renai Bodley talks to Utah Representative Rob Bishop about this week's congressional hearing on his Public Lands Initiative.  Park City Planning Commission Chairman Adam Strachan talks about the public tour of the Treasure Hill development site.  Park City Councilwoman Cindy Matsumoto gives an update on last night's meeting where council discussed the Library Field and the Special Events Advisory Committee.  Grammy winner Sting talks about why he picked Utah audiences to be the first to see his Broadway show after it left the Great White Way.

An update on the investigation into the deaths of two Treasure Mountain Junior High School Students tops this morning’s Local News Hour.  Host Renai Bodley talks to Park City Police Chief Wade Carpenter about the new synthetic drug “pink” and why police are concerned it could be in our community.  Then Summit County Councilman Tal Adair gives an update on criminal justice reform and a new plan to move non-violent drug offenders out of the jail and into supervision.  Snyderville Planning Commissioner Bea Peck talks about the Discovery CORE project, which is a mixed affordable housing project

Today's show begins with coverage of Tuesday's news conference about the deaths of two Treasure Mountain Junior High School students.  The last half of the show is a conversation with Park City Superintendent Dr. Ember Conley and counselor Sam Walsh about how educators are advising students and parents about the investigation and community-wide drug alert.   Park City Manager Diane Foster and Trails & Open Space Program Manager Heinrich Deters discuss possible plans for Library Field.

Park City Police Chief Wade Carpenter was on The Local News Hour this morning.  He gave new information about the synthetic drug "pink" and why he says it's in the community.  He also has an update on the investigation into the deaths of 13-year-old Grant Seavers and 13-year-old Ryan Ainsworth.    

Here is the entire 15 minute interview:

Wednesday afternoon Park City School District Superintendent Ember Conley and Park City Police Captain Phil Kirk held a news conference to update the community on the investigation of the deaths of two Treasure Mountain Junior High School students.  13-year-old Grant Seaver passed away at his home Sunday.  Tuesday, his friend Ryan Ainsworth, also 13, was found deceased at his home.


The deaths of two thirteen year old boys, who attended Treasure Mountain Junior High School has prompted a drug investigation by the Park city Police Department.  The synthetic opioid U-47700, street named, "Pink" or "Pinky" is part of the investigation.  Carolyn Murray has more:

Park City Police are investigating the deaths of two 13-year-old Treasure Mountain Junior High students.  The deaths occurred in two separate incidents.   Grant Seaver passed away Sunday.  Ryan Ainsworth died Tuesday morning.  Both died at their homes.  Police say there is no imminent threat to student safety.    However, they are issuing a community-wide alert about a synthetic opioid called "pink".   They stress there is no confirmation the drug is connected to the deaths of the two boys.

Park City Police Department & Park City School District

(Below is a statement from the Park City Police Department and the Park City School District)

Fatal Overdoses from Synthetic Opioid -- U-47700 -- in Utah

U-47700 (Also Known as “Pink” or “Pinky”): Extremely Dangerous Drug Appearing in Park City

  On today's program, host Renai Bodley previews Tuesday's Snyderville Basin Planning Commission meeting with commissioners Amir Caus and Ray Milliner.  On the agenda: surveillance cameras in Jeremy Ranch and a mixed affordable housing project near the Weilenmann School.    Then, Park City Education Foundation Director Abby McNulty checks in with news about this week's Author-In-Residence program, the new "Bright Futures" program and afterschool programs.  Finally, three members of this year's Park City Leadership class share their impressions of last weekend's City Tour.

SEAC Has More Questions Than Answers For City Council

Sep 9, 2016

Events in Park City have huge benefits for locals as they bring in sales tax revenue for the city but the Special Events Advisory Committee (SEAC)  is concerned that residents may be feeling overwhelmed by the number of summer events and the congestion it brings with it.