Alice Fordham

Alice Fordham is an NPR International Correspondent based in Beirut, Lebanon.

In this role, she reports on Lebanon, Syria and many of the countries throughout the Middle East.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Fordham covered the Middle East for five years, reporting for The Washington Post, the Economist, The Times and other publications. She has worked in wars and political turmoil but also amid beauty, resilience and fun.

In 2011, Fordham was a Stern Fellow at the Washington Post. That same year she won the Next Century Foundation's Breakaway award, in part for an investigation into Iraqi prisons.

Fordham graduated from Cambridge University with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics.

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Middle East
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Syrian Rebel Stronghold On The Verge Of Government Takeover

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

The Syrian city of Homs has been a rebel stronghold since the anti-government uprising began. But one rebel tells NPR that they're low on ammunition and medical gear.

Parallels
1:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Sunni Discontent Fuels Growing Violence In Iraq's Anbar Province

Iraqi Sunni masked protesters burn tires to block the main highway to Jordan and Syria, outside Fallujah, Iraq, on Dec. 30. Violence has returned to Iraq's Anbar province, with discontented ordinary Sunnis joining forces with al-Qaida-linked militants battling the Iraqi government.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Violence has reignited in western Iraq, with Islamist fighters taking over much of Anbar province three months ago. A renegade al-Qaida group has set up its headquarters in Fallujah — the city where hundreds of U.S. soldiers died a decade ago, trying to wrest it from insurgent control.

But this time, the enemy isn't the U.S. and it's not just extremists fighting. Ordinary Sunnis in Anbar, furious at what they call years of discrimination by the Shiite-dominated government, have joined the militants' battle against the Iraqi army.

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Iraq
1:43 am
Tue March 11, 2014

In Iraq, Anbar Faces Extremists Stronger Than Those U.S. Fought

Iraqi Shiite mourners carry the coffin of a soldier killed in clashes with anti-government fighters in Fallujah earlier this month. The government faces a months-long crisis in Anbar province, where it has lost the city of Fallujah as well as shifting parts of provincial capital Ramadi to anti-government militants.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 8:28 am

The extremists now committing a wave of attacks in Iraq's Anbar province are better trained, funded and equipped than the al-Qaida-linked groups American soldiers battled there, says Brett McGurk, one of the State Department's top officials for Iraq.

The militants, who have drawn strength amid the war in Syria over the border, have taken over parts of Anbar over the last three months.

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Iraq
2:14 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Splinters From Syria Reach Iraqi Kurds

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 6:42 pm

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Middle East
7:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Beirut's Suburbs Take New Precautions As Syrian Unrest Expands

Many shops in this area of Beirut, Lebanon, known as the Dahiyeh, are now lined with sandbags to shield them against possible bombings.
Tim Fitzsimons for NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 8:45 pm

Riding the bus to Beirut's southern suburbs used to be a bumpy, crowded but fun experience. Everyone crammed in next to each other, bouncing around on the way to the area they call the Dahiyeh, the Arabic word for "suburb."

This sprawling southern district of Lebanon's capital is the place where the Shiite militant group Hezbollah enjoys its strongest support. But it is also a bustling, residential area. There are garages and vegetable stalls. And in the center of the neighborhood, there are juice bars and cafes.

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