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At Ord Community Commissary near Monterey, Calif., there's fresh produce when you first walk in, ice cream, and meat in the back.

"Oh, we've got everything. We have lamb, we have veal," says Commissary Officer Alex King who manages the store. "Sushi is a big hit here. The customers are very much appreciative of that."

What makes the commissary different from a regular grocery store is who shops here – military troops, retirees and their families – and the savings they receive at the checkout counter.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Moshe the cat lives in an old brick house in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Washington, D.C. His owner, Cassandra Slack, moved in a little more than a year ago.

The first floor feels open and airy. Large windows bring a flood of light inside, making the original hardwood floors shine.

But downstairs, in the basement where Slack lives, the atmosphere is different. The floor is carpeted, the lights are dim, and the ceiling is low.

Slack had an eerie experience down here when she first moved in.

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of several things, among them race. The law, however, doesn't define "race."

It also doesn't say anything about hair.

Which brings us to Chastity Jones.

As South Sudan Fights, Refugees Flow Into Uganda

18 hours ago

One way to measure the growing turmoil in South Sudan is by the rapidly expanding refugee influx in neighboring Uganda.

A crowd of refugees press into a food distribution area at Pagirinya Refugee Settlement, one of the newest camps built to accommodate the latest arrivals in northern Uganda, just across the border from South Sudan.

Jonathan Taban, a father of six, explained that he's trying to see when he will receive food rations. He's been skipped twice now for a monthly allotment of grains, and he can't figure out why.

In a small room in Philadelphia's school administration building, Rosario Maribel Mendoza Lemus, 16, sits in a corner, rubbing sweaty palms on her jeans.

In front of her is a binder with a test she has to take before she's assigned to a new school. A counselor hovers over her shoulder, pointing to a drawing of a book.

She asks, in English: "Do you know what that is?"