Park City History Bits

Park City History
3:30 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Park City History Bits - December 19, 2013

Did you know Park City’s own Little Train That Could, could for about nine years?

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Park City History
4:06 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Park City History Bits - December 12, 2013

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

On July 5, 1905, spectators watching the Rio Grande Western train depart were horrified to see the engine suddenly rear up, topple down the embankment and settle on its side - just a thousand feet from the depot. 

News of the wreck spread quickly around Park City. 

Steam spewed from the broken engine and famous local ball player George Spillman made the courageous and risky move to jump inside the train’s cab to close the air valve.

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Park City History
5:22 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Park City History Bits - December 5, 2013

Did you know the “King of Denmark’s” saloon helped Park City recover from the Great Fire of 1898?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

George Wanning was born around 1859 in Denmark, arriving in Park City in the late 1870s. Wanning helped build the town, but what might have been his most significant mark on local history was his saloon.

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Park City History
3:14 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Park City History Bits - November 28, 2013

Did you remember how you used to get up the ski hill?

This is Chris Waddell with your weekly Park City History Bit.

When Treasure Mountains Resort (now Park City Mountain Resort) opened in 1963, it featured the Prospector double chairlift, two J-bars and a two-and-a-half-mile aerial tramway, said to be the longest in North America. A four-passenger gondola from the resort base to the top of Pinion Ridge quickly became a popular attraction.

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Park City History
11:59 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Park City History Bits - November 21, 2013

Did you know avoiding water was once a huge challenge for miners?

This is Mark Eaton, with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Park City’s Ontario mine descended 2,500 feet below ground, and a giant Cornish Pump had to pump nearly four million gallons a day from a thousand-foot depth to the drain tunnel on the 600-foot level.

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