Julie Hopkins

Did you know one of the largest drug busts in Park City took place in 1915?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

In the late 1800’s, mining wasn’t a glamorous job – it was a dirty, dangerous and almost always a fatal occupation. Miners liked to drink and carouse to escape things going on in their lives. But alcohol wasn’t the only thing used to forget their troubles – the world’s oldest natural drug, opium, was also used.  

Did you know at one time, Park City’s most distinguished landmark was a building, and not the mountains?

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

The local landmark known as the Coalition Building was the lower terminal of the Silver King Mining Company’s aerial tramway. It was located on Park Avenue, north, or downhill, of the Kimball Art Center. 

Did you know Park City had its own soda pop for almost 70 years?

This is Chris Waddell with your weekly Park City History Bit.

The McPolin’s Park City Bottling Works bottled and distributed soda from 1898 to 1965. Located on the corner of 13th and Park Avenue, many old time Parkites still remember the soda concocted within its walls. 

Did you know Park City has earned the nickname “Sin City” in Utah since the 1870s?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Park City’s brothels catered to the young single miners working long hours and residing in crowded boarding houses. Past accounts suggest that many high-standing men also covertly visited the women.

Do you know what special role certain immigrants from Michigan played in Park City’s history?

This is Mark Eaton with your Park City History Bit.

In 1873, four entrepreneurs from Grand Haven, Michigan – Edward Ferry, David McLaughlin, J. W. Mason and Frederick Nims – arrived in Park City and incorporated the Marsac Silver Mining Company. Edward Ferry purchased the Flagstaff Mine for $50,000, and it became their first holding. 

Did you know you once were able to get to Park City’s ski trails by subway?

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Two years after ski slopes opened in 1963 at Treasure Mountains Resort, now Park City Mountain Resort, a Skier's Subway was used to transport skiers nearly two-and-a-half miles into the mountain, through the pitch-black Spiro Tunnel.

Have you ever asked ‘Are those shoes in those trees?’ when you’ve driven up Deer Valley Drive?

This is Chris Waddell with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Before there was a trail under those trees, Pacific Avenue, nick-named Easy Street, lay there, lined with miner shacks. As Park City moved to skiing in the ‘60s, “hippies” began renting the street’s wood-framed buildings. About this time shoes began appearing in the trees.

If you ever thought alcohol was hard to get in Utah, imagine being at the Gold Label Liquor Company the night before Prohibition started.

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

The Gold Label Liquor Company held its grand opening in 1914 at 591 Main Street to great fanfare and for three years, business seemed to be going well. On August 1st, 1917, however, Utah became the 24th of 48 states to join Prohibition and outlaw alcoholic beverages.

Did you know Park City’s own Little Train That Could, could for about nine years?

This is Mark Eaton with your weekly Park City History Bit.

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

On July 5, 1905, spectators watching the Rio Grande Western train depart were horrified to see the engine suddenly rear up, topple down the embankment and settle on its side - just a thousand feet from the depot. 

News of the wreck spread quickly around Park City. 

Steam spewed from the broken engine and famous local ball player George Spillman made the courageous and risky move to jump inside the train’s cab to close the air valve.

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