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The Salt
3:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

When Your Child's Food Allergies Are A Matter Of Life And Death

Laurel Francoeur's son Jeremy is severely allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, sesame and shellfish.
Courtesy of Laurel Francoeur

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 4:46 pm

Laurel Francoeur's son Jeremy was about a year old when he had his first life- threatening allergic reaction. She took him to the doctor when hives started to cover his whole body. Tests revealed severe allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, sesame and shellfish.

Like many parents of children with severe food allergies, Francoeur faces a host of unique challenges.

"It's a lot of planning," she says. "You have to always plan where you're going, how you're going to eat when you get there. Will the food be safe? Will he have something to eat?"

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The Salt
8:54 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Think You Know How To Cook Eggs? Chances Are You're Doing It Wrong

"The egg is a lens through which to view the entire craft of cooking," says food writer Michael Ruhlman.
Donna Turner Ruhlman

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:41 am

Just in time for Easter, food writer Michael Ruhlman has a new cookbook that will likely change the way you think about the egg. At the very least, you may learn how to spruce up your scrambled egg technique.

Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World's Most Versatile Ingredient is a guide to perfecting the most familiar of egg dishes β€” from poached to hard boiled β€” but also mastering bΓ©arnaise sauce and meringues.

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Africa
2:39 am
Fri April 11, 2014

African Responses Night And Day From Rwanda, U.N. Envoy Says

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power addresses top officials from the African peacekeeping mission in Bangui, Central African Republic, on Wednesday.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 11:55 am

This week marks the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide: three months of slaughter in which nearly a million people were killed.

As a scholar, Samantha Power wrote extensively about the U.S. failure to intervene in Rwanda and bring the genocide to an end. Now, as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Power led the American delegation to memorial services in Rwanda this past Monday.

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StoryCorps
2:00 am
Fri April 11, 2014

One Man Becomes Another's Hands, Feet And Family

Ernest Greene (left) accompanied Collin Smith to college. When Collin graduated, the school awarded Ernest an honorary degree.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 6:24 am

When he was a high school sophomore, Collin Smith was in a car accident that left him a quadriplegic.

Ernest Greene, 50 years Collin's senior, had never met Collin, but he attended the same church. And when he heard about Collin's accident, he decided he wanted to help. He offered to do whatever Collin needed, from taking him to school to helping him shave. And when Collin began college, Ernest went too.

"What made you want to go to college with me?" Collin, now 23, asked Ernest in a visit to StoryCorps in Asheboro, N.C.

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Paying For College
1:53 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Paying Off Student Loans Puts A Dent In Wallets, And The Economy

Student loan debt forces many young adults to make hard choices about how they spend their money β€” and can prevent them from making investments that will pay off down the road.
David Sacks Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 7:38 am

Weighing in at more than $1 trillion, student loan debt is now larger than total credit card debt. Morning Edition recently asked young adults about their biggest concerns, and more than two-thirds of respondents mentioned college debt. Many say they have put off marriage or buying a home because of the financial burden they took on as students.

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News
2:40 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Utah Gay Marriage Gets Hearing In Appeals Court

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Debate: In An Online World, Are Brick And Mortar Colleges Obsolete?

Two teams debated the value of online education in an Intelligence Squared U.S. event at Columbia University.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:18 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world.

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All Tech Considered
10:28 am
Wed April 9, 2014

The New Age: Leaving Behind Everything, Or Nothing At All

After Susan Sontag died in 2004, the writer's estate sold her letters, computers and other materials to UCLA for a special collection. Her biographer says the wealth of information can be daunting β€” and a bit eerie.
Jens-Ulrich Koch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:48 pm

Perhaps in your attic or basement there is a box of papers β€” letters, photographs, cards, maybe even journals β€” inherited from a grandparent or other relative who's passed on. Authors, archivists and researchers have long considered these treasures. The right box might contain a wealth of information about a key historical period or place or person.

But what if that box isn't a box at all? What if it's an ancient laptop? And if we are starting to leave behind an increasingly digital inheritance, will it die as soon as the hard drive does?

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World
4:29 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Fighting For Rwanda's Justice In France

Rwandan genocide-hunter Dafroza Gauthier on February 4, 2014 at the opening of the trial of Pascal Simbikangwa, Rwanda's former intelligence chief, charged with complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
MARTIN BUREAU AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:00 pm

For more than a decade, Dafroza Gauthier and her husband, Alain, have hunted perpetrators of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. More than 800,000 people were killed in the genocide, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic group.

Earlier this month, the couple gave testimony against former Rwandan intelligence chief Pascal Simbikangwa in Paris. On March 14, Simbikangwa was sentenced to 25 years in prison for complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. His was the first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France.

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Africa
10:31 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Since Genocide, Rwanda's Women Have Helped Lead The Recovery

Rwanda is commemorating the 20-year anniversary of the genocide. Since that time, more women have entered politics to help with the recovery.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

The Rwandan genocide left a deep and profound wound. It not only decimated the Rwandan people, it destroyed the nation's political and social structures.

In 1994, after the killing stopped, women made up 70 percent of the population.

They were needed to lead Rwanda's recovery. Rwandan women moved away from traditional roles and joined politics in unprecedented numbers.

Twenty years later, the Rwandan Parliament has more women than anywhere else in the world.

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