Eleanor Beardsley

Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture and gastronomy.

Beardsley has covered both 2007 and 2012 French presidential elections as well as the Arab Spring in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. She reported on the riots in French suburbs in 2005 and the massive student demonstrations in 2006. Beardsley has followed the Tour de France cycling race and been back to her old stomping ground — Kosovo — to report for NPR on three separate occasions.

Prior to moving to Paris, Beardsley worked for three years with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. She also worked as a television producer for French broadcaster TF1 in Washington, DC and as a staff assistant to Senator Strom Thurmond.

Reporting from France for Beardsley is the fulfillment of a lifelong passion for the French language and culture. At the age of 10 she began learning French by reading the Asterix The Gaul comic book series with her father.

While she came to the field of radio journalism relatively late in her career, Beardsley says her varied background, studies and travels prepared her for the job as well as any journalism school. "I love reporting on the French because there are so many stereotypes about them that exist in America," she says. "Sometimes it's fun to dispel the false notions and show a different side of the French. And sometimes the old stereotypes do hold up. But whether Americans love or hate France and the French, they're always interested!"

A native of South Carolina, Beardsley has a Bachelor of Arts in European history and French from Furman University in Greenville, S.C., and a Masters Degree in International Business from the University of South Carolina.

Beardsley is interested in politics, travel and observing foreign cultures. Her favorite cities are Paris and Istanbul.

Pages

Europe
2:22 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

In France, The Seeds Of A Hatred Renewed

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 4:57 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
4:15 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

France Presses On With Deal To Sell Two Warships To Russia

People holding Ukrainian and Crimean Tatar flags demonstrate in front of the French-built Vladivostok warship in St. Nazaire, western France, on June 1. The protesters are opposed to the sale of the Vladivostok and Sevastopol warships to Russia.
Jean-Sebastien Evrard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:31 pm

France plans to go ahead with the sale of two warships to the Kremlin, even as the European Union and U.S. strengthen sanctions on Russia amid continued fighting in Ukraine and the aftermath of the downed Malaysian airliner.

Read more
Parallels
4:13 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Despite Mideast Turmoil, More French Jews Are Moving To Israel

Rabbi Michel Serfaty (right), head of the Jewish-Muslim Alliance of France, stands next to a Muslim cleric, or imam, as they both hold signs wishing Muslims a happy Ramadan. The rabbi and the imam have also traded hats. Despite efforts by Serfaty's group, a record number of French Jews are expected to move to Israel this year.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 8:53 am

Jews are leaving France and moving to Israel in unprecedented numbers this year.

With the departures expected to surpass 5,000, France could pull ahead of the U.S. for Jewish emigration to Israel, known as aliya. Usually, making aliya is a cause for celebration. But in France this year, it's tinged with bitterness.

Read more
The Salt
11:54 am
Mon July 21, 2014

From Scratch Or Not? French Restaurant Law Stirs Controversy

A new logo that is supposed to ensure a Paris restaurant's food is homemade (fait maison in French) is already stirring up controversy.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:04 pm

If you go to France this summer, you might notice a new logo in restaurant windows or on menus. It's a simple graphic of a rooftop covering a saucepan, and it's supposed to designate fait maison, or homemade. It's designed to highlight places that make their own dishes rather than bringing in frozen or sous vide — prepared meals cooked in a water bath, sealed in airtight plastic bags and designed to be heated up later.

Read more
Sports
8:41 am
Sat July 5, 2014

A Cleaner Tour De France Kicks Off With A Nod To WWI

Sprinters Mark Cavendish of Britain (second left) and Germany's Andre Greipel, (right) shake hands as Britain's Christopher Froome (second right) and Spain's Alberto Contador (left) wait for the start of the first stage of the Tour de France on Saturday.
Christophe Ena AP

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 11:08 am

Last year, the Tour de France celebrated its 100th anniversary with a spectacular sound and light show at the Arc de Triomphe during the closing ceremony.

It might be hard to duplicate that kind of enthusiasm at this year's Tour, which begins Saturday, especially with competition from the World Cup in Brazil. But the 2014 Tour will be special too, says Matthieu Barberousse, a journalist with L'Equipe sports newspaper.

Read more
Europe
10:59 am
Sun June 29, 2014

In Paris, Training Wheels For The Littlest Riders

Not quite 3 years old, Oscar Bayeda is just learning to ride with the help of P'tit Velib's bike-sharing program for children.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 1:58 pm

A bike rental scheme in Paris that began seven years ago has been such a success, the city has launched a version for children. Parents can now rent bikes for tots up to 8 years old at locations across the city.

Officials say the program won't cost Paris a cent and might help build a new generation of environmentally conscious citizens — or perhaps inspire a few future Tour de France champions.

Read more
Parallels
12:42 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Brutal Vigilante Attack On Roma Teen Shocks France

Women from the Roma community push a shopping trolley containing water toward their camp in Sucy-en-Brie, near Paris, in a photo from 2012.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 5:12 pm

A vigilante attack against a Roma teenager has shocked France and put pressure on the French government to improve conditions for the ethnic minority. Human rights advocates say the rise of a xenophobic climate in the country may have contributed to the attack.

Read more
Europe
8:59 am
Sun June 8, 2014

One Frenchman's Commitment To Keeping D-Day Memories Alive

Frenchman Joseph Dellecolle, (left) 63, and his son Pierre-Yves, 40, dressed in American uniforms and drove a 1940s American military jeep to attend the D-Day commemoration on the beaches of Normandy. The elder Dellecolle says he attends every year and cries when he thinks of the many sacrifices made to liberate Europe.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:18 pm

During my many visits to Normandy, I have come across many French people committed to preserving the memory of the young men who sacrificed their lives here to liberate the continent from Nazi tyranny. On my latest, trip, I met up again with Joseph Delecolle, who I had interviewed at the 60th D-Day anniversary in 2004.

Delecolle was back, dressed as before in the uniform of an American GI and driving his rebuilt, 1940s-era American jeep.

Read more
News
2:13 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Allies Land Again In Normandy, This Time To Honor D-Day Vets

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 1:35 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
5:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Le Pen Victory In France Presents A Paradox For Hollande

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Far-right political parties won big in European parliamentary elections in many countries last weekend. Their victory was particularly painful in France, a founding member of the European Union, and has deepened the sense of crisis for the very unpopular Socialist president, Francois Hollande. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

Read more

Pages