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The Salt
7:40 am
Fri March 28, 2014

The Hippest Winery In Mexico Is Made Of Recycled Boats

Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent incorporated materials salvaged from boats into the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley.
Courtesy of Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 11:22 am

A lot of artists say they find inspiration in unlikely places. Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent, designers based in Ensenada, Mexico, most often find theirs digging through dumpsters and junkyards.

Their work, however, isn't remotely trashy. One of their latest creations, the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley, is sleek and totally modern. It's one of a growing number of wineries that's designed to give visitors a memorable visual experience — not just a taste of fine wine.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Fri March 28, 2014

House Intelligence Chairman Mike Rogers Won't Seek Re-Election

Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., during an appearance last year on CBS News' Face the Nation. The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee says he won't seek re-election in November.
Chris Usher AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 2:17 pm

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., confirmed Friday that he will not seek re-election in November and is going to host a talk show on the Cumulus radio network starting next year.

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The Two-Way
6:03 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Death Toll From Mudslide 'Will Only Increase'

Searchers approach the site of the mudslide in Oso, Wash., that tore through about 50 homes and properties.
Ted S. Warren/Pool EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:46 pm

Officials expect to release more information later today about the death toll from last weekend's massive mudslide in Oso, Wash., and they're warning that the news is going to be grim.

"We understand there has been confusion over the reported number of fatalities," Snohomish County District 21 Fire Chief Travis Hots said Thursday. "The sadness here is that we know this number will only increase."

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U.S.
5:48 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Of Me I Sing: Americans Construct An Opt-Out Society

Parents are being encouraged to keep their children from taking standardized tests in school.
Shannon DeCelle AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 1:01 pm

Americans want to go their own way.

The right of individuals to question authority is one of the strongest facets of American life. But the ability to strike out on your own has always been balanced against the need for communal action in a complicated, continental country.

Right now, the pendulum is swinging more toward individualism.

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Fri March 28, 2014

New Lead Shifts Search For Missing Jet 700 Miles North

The new search area for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is about 1,100 miles west of Perth, Australia. Previous search areas are shaded gray and were about 700 miles to the southwest.
Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 11:45 am

Update at 9:25 a.m. ET. Aircraft Spot "Multiple Objects;" Search Concludes For The Day:

On their first day of searching a new area of the Southern Indian Ocean for any sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, "five aircraft spotted multiple objects of various colors," the Australian Maritime Safety Authority said Friday.

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The Salt
1:27 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Why We Got Fatter During The Fat-Free Food Boom

The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies.
Youtube and RetroJunk

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:24 am

If you want to trace Americans' fear of fat, the place to start is the U.S. Senate, during the steamy days of July 1976.

That's when Sen. George McGovern called a hearing to raise attention to the links between diet and disease.

And what was the urgency? The economy was booming, and many Americans were living high on the hog. A 1954 Capitol Hill restaurant menu offers a glimpse of what lunch looked like then: steak with claret sauce, buttered succotash and pineapple cheesecake. But soon, that prosperity began to cast a dark shadow within the halls of Congress.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Obamacare's National Enrollment Looks OK, But States Matter More

Maygan Rollins, a field organizer with Enroll America, talked health insurance options with Jerry Correa during a recent campaign in Miami.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:23 pm

With this year's deadline to register for individual health insurance just a weekend away, much attention is being lavished on two numbers — the 6 million Americans who have signed up so far, and the percentage of those folks who are (or aren't) young.

But experts say the national numbers actually don't mean very much.

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Planet Money
1:26 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Comparing Law School Rankings? Read The Fine Print

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:12 am

When students go to law school, they make a bunch of calculations. A big one is cost: top schools charge more than $50,000 a year, and graduate-student debt is on the rise. Another key calculation: The likelihood of getting a good job after graduation.

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Parallels
1:25 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Born From The Border, Tijuana Grows In New Ways

Family members huddle at the fence to talk to loved ones living across the border.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:24 am

Tijuana is itself a creation of the border. The borderline was drawn here in 1848, as the United States completed its conquest of the present-day American Southwest. The border, along with the growth of San Diego and Los Angeles, gave Tijuana a reason to be.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
1:24 am
Fri March 28, 2014

IMF's Lagarde: Women In Workforce Key To Healthy Economies

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde in Brussels earlier this year. Lagarde says women are underutilized in the global economy.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:12 am

As the first woman to lead the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde is among an elite group of people determining how money is saved, spent and invested worldwide.

It's not the first time she's been a "first." Lagarde was France's first female finance minister, and before that, the first woman to chair the global law firm Baker & McKenzie.

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