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Our series, "Take A Number," is exploring problems around the world — and the people who are trying to solve them — through the lens of a single number.

Twenty-one days. If you get sued for debt in Utah, that's how long you have to respond to a complaint in the mail.

The complaints are fine-print legalese and they're confusing. But despite that, 98.5 percent of the state's debtors try to navigate the process themselves, without any legal help. And they often end up paying more than they should.

Jean Loesch and her family live in Seeley Lake, Mont., which saw the longest and most intense smoke from Montana's wildfires this summer. Loesch has 10 children, adopted or in her foster care, and they are learning what it's like to have lingering respiratory problems.

Last summer, Loesch says, the smoke was so thick outside, the family couldn't see the trees across the street, so they stayed inside. It was still really hard to breathe.

"These guys were miserable," Loesch says. "I think each one of them ended up having to go to the doctor." Everyone needed inhalers.

American politics have always been rife with individuals who invoked the Almighty and sought divine leverage to achieve their own agendas.

Partisans on both the right and the left have revered such figures – when they agreed with their ends – and reviled them when they did not.

But it is hard to think of any clergy in any era who have ascended quite so far in the national political consciousness as Billy Graham.

This week in the Russia investigations: More newcomers join Mueller's roll of honor; the feds meet with state officials on election security; and Washington starts thinking about considering some potential planning to defend the 2018 midterms.

Guilty

Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller broke his own record this week for guilty pleas. On Tuesday, Dutch attorney Alex van der Zwaan appeared in federal court and admitted he had lied to investigators about his contacts with Donald Trump's former campaign vice chairman, Rick Gates.

Daring To Dream: A Carpenter Tries To Build A Piano In Rwanda

Feb 24, 2018

It's Monday afternoon and Désiré Mulumeoderwa is alone in his workshop, an oasis of quiet and creativity from the parade of motorbikes and perpetual hustle outside on Kigali's streets. The mud floor is littered with planks of wood in all shapes and sizes, scraps of plastic and other discarded materials Mulumeoderwa uses in his carpentry work.

Chairs, cupboards and bed frames are in various stages of construction around the dimly-lit shop. Off in a corner by the door is a project unlike any other.

Mulumeoderwa is building an upright piano.

Nadezhda Sergeeva of Russia has tested positive for a banned substance and has been disqualified from the Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said Saturday.

Sergeeva was ranked 12th in the women's bobsleigh, but is now disqualified from the event and "the results obtained" by her team "at the same event are disqualified with all resulting consequences," the organization said in a statement.

With a gold medal in the snowboard parallel giant slalom, Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic has become the first woman in Winter Olympics history to win a gold medal in two different sports at the same Olympic Games.

On Saturday she emerged victorious in the final run against Germany's Selina Joerg, finishing just 0.46 seconds ahead. Joerg took silver in the event, followed by Ramona Theresia Hofmeister, also of Germany, who took bronze.

Updated at 6:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. men's curling team made history on Saturday at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, playing in — and winning — the first gold medal curling game ever to feature an American team. Led by John Shuster, the U.S. broke out late to upset Sweden, which had lost only two games in South Korea coming into the final.

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

The White House went on lockdown for a while on Friday afternoon after a female driver struck a nearby security barrier and was "immediately apprehended" by officers, according to the Secret Service.

The agency said in a statement it has had "previous encounters" with the woman they say is 35, white and from LaVergne, Tenn. The statement said she has been charged with "numerous criminal violations," and turned over to Washington, D.C., police.

Nearly four months after their billionaire owner shut them down, local news sites Gothamist, LAist and DCist will come back to life under new ownership: public radio stations.

WNYC in New York will buy Gothamist, Southern California's KPCC will acquire LAist, and WAMU in Washington, D.C., is taking over DCist.

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