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When Phejin Konyak was a girl, she'd sit on her grandfather's lap in front of a roaring fireplace, with a pot of black tea simmering. He'd tell her folk tales. She was entranced by the stories — but even more by the jet black tattoos that curved over his eyes, nose, upper lip and chin. His neck, chest and body were filled with geometrical shapes and patterns.

When she went to boarding school at age 4, she began to realize that her grandfather's tattooed body – and indeed, the tattooed bodies of his fellow tribesmen – were quite extraordinary.

Dressed in a sharp black suit, Syrian President Bashar Assad smiles for selfies with his soldiers against a backdrop of blown-out buildings and a battered tank. Weary-looking men crowd around him and chant the slogan frequently heard on this side of the country's war: "With our spirit and our blood, we will free you Bashar!"

This week, pro-regime media posted photos and videos of Assad visiting what they claimed was a town regime forces had recently captured in eastern Ghouta, an area east of the capital Damascus.

Money talks and students walk in this week's edition of the education news roundup.

National student march

In Washington, D.C., and around the world today, young people and their families and supporters march in support of gun safety. The web site for the march, led by survivors of February's shooting in Parkland, Fla., lists more than 800 separate events including in Israel, Argentina and Finland.

Our latest NPR Ed video takes on that question so many parents are asking: How much time should my kid spend looking at phones and screens and tablets and TVs and ...

In a nutshell (and inspired by food writer Michael Pollan), my advice is:

"Enjoy screens. Not too much. Mostly together."

Marchers around the world will call for stricter gun control laws Saturday, including many who are demonstrating for a cause for the first time.

More than 500,000 are expected in Washington, D.C., alone, site of the main "March For Our Lives." There are at least 837 other events happening internationally, according to the event's official website.

A version of this story was first published by member station Vermont Public Radio.

It's a political insult that dates back to the 1800s: "He couldn't get elected dogcatcher."

Investigators with Britain's information commissioner searched the London headquarters of Cambridge Analytica on Friday amid reports that the firm harvested the personal data of millions of Facebook users as part of a campaign to influence the U.S. 2016 presidential elections.

There is no greater burn than pretending you've never heard of something when that thing has 2.2 billion monthly active users. And Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, lobbed a fiery zinger at the world's leading social-media behemoth Friday when he asked on Twitter: "What's Facebook?"

He added fuel to the flame when he later deleted both company pages, becoming another tech billionaire jumping on the #DeleteFacebook movement.

Many lives in the Parkland, Fla., community were transformed forever following the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people on Feb. 14.

In 1963, high school students in Birmingham, Ala. marched in protest of segregation. Hundreds were arrested, sprayed by hoses and attacked by dogs. As high school students get ready to come to Washington, D.C. for the "March For Our Lives," several of those 1963 marchers weigh in on their experiences and view of today's student movement.