Park City History Bits
11:26 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Park City History Bits - June 13, 2013

Premiered June 13, 2013

Do you know who brought celebrities and literati to Park City decades before Robert Redford did?

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Exotic dancer Shirley Price, known as “The Duchess”, arrived in Park City in the 1960s after leaving Hawaii and Las Vegas, and made the town her home and stage. She performed her illustrious act at the C’est Bon, located where the Sweetwater Lift Lodge now stands, and the Ore Haus, which stood at 1410 Empire Avenue.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Rupert Murdoch And Wife Wendi Are Divorcing

Rupert and Wendi Deng Murdoch at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in West Hollywood on Feb. 24.
Hubert Boesl DPA /LANDOV

Two years after she leaped to his defense with the "head slap seen 'round the world," Wendi and Rupert Murdoch are apparently splitting up.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Federal Judge To Face Rare Review Over Controversial Remarks

This undated photo provided by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals shows Judge Edith Jones.
Anonymous Court of Appeals via AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:09 pm

The story of U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Edith Jones involves a controversial speech to the Federalist Society, calls of racism, last-ditch efforts to stop an execution and now a rare formal disciplinary review by the Judicial Council of the District of Columbia Circuit.

The case has been bubbling for the past couple of weeks. It's complicated, but interesting, so we'll tell you about it in chronological order.

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The Salt
10:59 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Israel's Rabbis Seek To Bend Pastries To Their Will

What's what? In Israel, the shape of a boureka pastry traditionally tells you what's inside. Now the country's chief rabbis want the shapes to get a lot more specific to help people keep kosher.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:18 am

Anyone who follows a particular diet knows the challenge of eating out. How do you know exactly what's in the food?

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Shots - Health News
10:53 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Prevention Pill Cuts HIV Risk For Injecting Drug Users

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should prescribe Truvada, a once-a-day pill for HIV, to help prevent infections in IV drug users.
Jeff Chiu AP

A once-a-day pill has been proven to lower the risk of getting HIV among needle-using drug addicts, just as it does among heterosexual couples and men who have sex with men.

Among 2,400 injecting drug users in Bangkok, those assigned to take a daily dose of an antiviral drug Viread, or tenofovir generically, had half the risk of getting HIV over a four-year period as those who took a placebo pill. Among those who took tenofovir faithfully, there were 74 percent fewer infections.

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Karen Grigsby Bates is the Los Angeles-based correspondent for NPR News. Bates contributed commentaries to All Things Considered for about 10 years before she joined NPR in 2002 as the first correspondent and alternate host for The Tavis Smiley Show. In addition to general reporting and substitute hosting, she increased the show's coverage of international issues and its cultural coverage, especially in the field of literature and the arts.

The Two-Way
10:15 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Will Rain-Disrupted U.S. Open Be Too Easy Or Hard As Ever?

A man finds some shelter from the rain Thursday at the U.S. Open, which is being played at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:05 am

After being suspended less than two hours after the first players teed off, play is set to resume early Thursday afternoon at the U.S. Open golf championship, which this year is being held at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa., outside Philadelphia. Heavy rains forced the delay.

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The Salt
10:14 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Old McDonald Might Be A Lady: More Women Take Up Farming

Lisa Steketee restocks strawberries during the Laramie Farmers Market in Wyoming, in 2009.
Ben Woloszyn AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 10:18 am

More women are getting into farming, according to a recent analysis from the U.S Department of Agriculture.

The agency crunched numbers from the Agriculture Census and found that the number of U.S. farms operated by women nearly tripled over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 14 percent by 2007.

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Code Switch
10:09 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Moynihan Black Poverty Report Revisited 50 Years Later

Daniel P. Moynihan appeared before the Senate Government Operations subcommittee in 1966. He had conducted a study on poverty among blacks.
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:45 am

On Wednesday, the Urban Institute released a new report that revisits a famous study conducted almost 50 years ago by the late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan. The original study, "The Negro Family: The Case for National Action," was written by Moynihan when he was an assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor. In the report, Moynihan listed a series of ills he argued had helped cause poverty in black America.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin To Step Down

Surgeon General Regina Benjamin speaks on health disparities in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 5, 2012.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

After four years on the job, the nation's top doctor is leaving. U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin announced late Wednesay that she plans to step down next month.

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