Around the Nation
1:29 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Baseball League Creates 'Islands' Of Refuge For Camden Kids

Angel Ramirez, a North Camden Little League player, walks through the Sixth Street drug corridor, known as "Heroin Highway," on his way home from practice in Camden, N.J. The Little League program is aimed at keeping kids in the struggling city engaged in a sport after school.
Gabe Dinsmoor for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:00 pm

At a small park in Pyne Poynt on the north side of Camden, N.J., kids take practice cuts on the infield dirt and adjust their hats. A small but enthusiastic crowd shouts words of encouragement, but the cheering parents and playful bench-side scuffles only momentarily disguise the troubles in the city. Baggies, vials and hypodermic needles litter the same field where practice is being held.

"Each day, our kids walk past drug sets and open air drug use," says Bryan Morton, the North Camden Little League president.

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Shots - Health News
12:43 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Mining Cell Data To Answer Cancer's Tough Questions

Chemistry, genetics and computing give us clues to understand cancer cells.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:47 pm

Sometimes a drug hits cancer hard. Sometimes the cancer cells are unfazed. But it's often hard to know which outcome to expect.

A group of scientists at the National Cancer Institute has spent the last three years turning some mathematical algorithms loose on giant sets of data to better understand the relationship between cancerous cells and cancer drugs.

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All Tech Considered
12:42 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

A Bedding Innovation For People Who Hate Making Their Beds

Smart Bedding demo photo.
Courtesy of Smart Bedding

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:51 pm

In a blog series we're calling "Weekly Innovation," we'll explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Last week we featured the sink-urinal. (Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Florida Man Who Woke Up Speaking Swedish Is ID'd By Sister

Michael Boatwright, an amnesia sufferer who now refers to himself as Johan Ek, during an interview at the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, Calif.
Jay Calderon The Desert Sun

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:32 pm

One of the odder stories of the day is that of 61-year-old Michael Boatwright, "a Florida man who awoke speaking only Swedish, with no memory of his past, after he was found unconscious four months ago at a Southern California motel," as The Associated Press writes.

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The Two-Way
11:39 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Cuba Acknowledges N. Korean Ship Carried Its 'Obsolete' Weapons

View of North Korean vessel at the Manzanillo Port in Colon on Tuesday.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:53 pm

(Updated 9:40 p.m. ET)

A statement from Cuba's foreign ministry says weapons that Panama seized in a North Korean ship were mid-20th Century models that Cuba was sending to North Korea for repair, according to reports from the BBC and Reuters.

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Shots - Health News
11:37 am
Tue July 16, 2013

The Family That Tweets Together Stays Together

Snapchatting, Dad? Could be helping you stay close to the kids.
iStockphoto.com

Retweeted by Mom? Teenagers might say they'd die of embarrassment. But teenagers who are connected with their parents via Twitter and other social media have better relationships with them, and fewer behavioral problems.

A study that asked teens if they used social media to communicate with their parents found that half said yes. And 16 percent said they used social media with their parents every day.

Half of the teens in a this study said they used social media to communicate with the folks. Almost 20 percent said they communicated with Mom and Dad that way every day.

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The Salt
10:45 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Yoed Anis, president of the Texas Sake Company, says "the only constraint holding us back" from faster growth is the absence of a sufficient and consistent rice supply.
Courtesy Texas Sake Company

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:29 am

Most of us are familiar with that hot, musky-smelling, cloudy drink served in teacups at sushi bars and sometimes called, erroneously, "rice wine." In other words, most of us have had bad sake.

But finally, Americans are learning to love the good stuff.

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NPR Story
10:07 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Will 'Stand Your Ground' Laws Stand Up To Scrutiny?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program we will speak with our money coach Alvin Hall about why you cannot take a break from watching your finances, no matter how hot it is. He'll have tips for a mid-year financial check-in. That's later in the program.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Cooling Tensions, Senate Confirms Cordray

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid walks with Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois (right) after a joint caucus meeting on Monday.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 5:11 pm

In the shadow of a dramatic showdown over the filibuster of White House nominations, the Senate voted to advance the nomination of Richard Cordray to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The 71-29 cloture vote means the nomination overcame the 60-vote threshold needed to break a filibuster and bring the nomination up for an up-or-down vote before the Senate.

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Parallels
9:20 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Latin Drug Bosses And Their Growing American Ties

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:42 am

Latin American cartels are fueled by U.S. drug demand, so their illegal retail networks often stretch throughout America. Mexico's arrest of Miguel Angel Trevino Morales was a reminder that the connections between drug traffickers and the U.S. are not just commercial — they're also personal.

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